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Visual Arts

A student can take a variety of visual art courses depending on what interests them. They include 2D Art (Drawing and Painting), Digital Art Imaging, Ceramics, and Creative Photography. 

Courses Include: 

Ceramics/Pottery 1
Students explore how space, mass, balance, and form combine to create aesthetic forms or utilitarian products and structures. Instructional focus will be on ceramics and/or pottery. Media may include, but are not limited to, clay and/or plaster, with consideration of the workability, durability, cost, and toxicity of the media used. Student artists consider the relationship of scale (i.e., hand-held, human, monumental) through the use of positive and negative space or voids, volume, visual weight, and gravity to create low/high relief or freestanding structures for personal intentions or public places. They explore sharp and diminishing detail, size, position, overlapping, visual pattern, texture, implied line, space, and plasticity, reflecting craftsmanship and quality in the surface and structural qualities of the completed art forms. Students in the ceramics and/or pottery art studio focus on use of safety procedures for process, media, and techniques. Student artists use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials. 

Ceramics/Pottery 2
Students explore spatial relationships through the use of nonobjective, abstract, or representational forms, products, or structures. Instructional focus should be on ceramics and/or pottery. Processes and techniques for substitution may include, but are not limited to, wheel-thrown clay, glaze formulation and application. Media may include, but are not limited to, clay and/or plaster with consideration of the workability, durability, cost, and toxicity of the media used. Ceramic and/or pottery artists experiment with and manipulate space-producing devices, including overlapping, transparency, interpenetration, vertical and horizontal axis, inclined planes, disproportionate scale, fractional or abstracted representation, and spatial properties of the structural art elements. Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface and structural qualities of the completed art forms. Students in the ceramics and/or pottery art studio focus on use of safety procedures for process, media, and techniques. Student artists use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.

Ceramics/Pottery 3 Honors
Students communicate a sense of 4-D, motion, and/or time, based on creative use of spatial relationships and innovative treatment of space and its components. Instruction may include content in ceramics, pottery, or other related media. Students address 4-D, the inter-relatedness of art and context, and may also include installation or collaborative works, virtual realities, light as a medium (i.e., natural, artificial, or reflective), or flexible, entered, or activated space. Other concepts for exploration include tension, compression or expansion, intrusions or extrusions, grouping, proximity, containment, closure, contradiction, and continuity. Ceramic and/or pottery artists experiment with processes, techniques, and media, which may include, but are not limited to, casting and kiln-firing techniques, and
mold making. Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface and structural qualities of the completed art forms. Students in the ceramics and/or pottery art studio focus on use of safety procedures for process, media, and techniques. Student artists use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works.
This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.

Advanced Placement Studio Art Three-Dimensional Design
Advanced Placement Studio Art Two-Dimensional Design
Advanced Placement Studio Art Drawing
The AP Program offers three studio art courses and portfolios: Two-Dimensional Design, Three-Dimensional Design, and Drawing. The AP Studio Art portfolios are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. Students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The AP Studio Art Program consists of three portfolios - 2D design, 3D Design, and Drawing, corresponding to the most common college foundation courses. Students may choose to submit any or all of the Drawing, Two-Dimensional Design, or Three-Dimensional design portfolios. AP Studio Art students create a portfolio of work to demonstrate the artistic skills and ideas they have developed, refined, and applied over the course of the year to produce visual compositions. 

Two-Dimensional Studio Art
Students experiment with the media and techniques used to create a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) artworks through the development of skills in drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, and/or design. Students practice, sketch, and manipulate the structural elements of art to improve mark making and/or the organizational principles of design in a composition from observation, research, and/or imagination. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials

Creative Photography 1
Students explore the aesthetic foundations of art making using beginning photography techniques. This course may include, but is not limited to, color and/or black and white photography via digital media and/or traditional photography. Students become familiar with the basic mechanics of a camera, including lens and shutter operation, compositional foundations, printing an image for display, and evaluating a successful print. Student photographers may use a variety of media and materials, such as 35mm black and white film, single lens reflex camera, digital camera, darkroom, computer application, filters, various papers, digital output, photogram, cyanotypes, Sabatier effect, and pinhole photography. Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface of the prints and the care of the materials. Photographers use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials

Creative Photography 2
Students experiment with a variety of photographic media and techniques, and make connections with historical and contemporary photographers to develop a focused body of work. This course may include, but is not limited to, researching the history of photography, making connections to contemporary and community photographers, critiquing with varied techniques, and experimenting with a variety of photographic media. Processes and techniques include, but are not limited to, handcrafted pinhole cameras, hand-tinted photographs, mixed media, cyanotypes, medium format, photo collage, cross-processing, creative filters, infrared and slide film, night photography, macro, panoramic, and/or digital output via a variety of media. Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface of the prints, care of the materials, attention to compositional conventions, and expression of ideas and feelings. Photographers use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials. 

Creative Photography 3 Honors
Students lead a focused investigation of a subject matter from ideation to completion. Students select a theme, develop a concept, and prepare the work for public viewing, portfolio, distribution, and/or exhibit. This course may include, but is not limited to, research, collaboration, installation, history of photography, making connections to
contemporary and community photographers, and critiquing with varied techniques. Processes, techniques, and media may include, but are not limited to, video, film, high speed photography, studio lighting, flash, long exposure, formal portraiture, large format, HDR, RAW processing, and digital output on a variety of media, including non-traditional
materials. Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface of the print, care of the materials, attention to compositional conventions, the display setting, and expression of ideas and feelings. Photographers use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works. This course incorporates hands-on
activities and consumption of art materials.

Portfolio Development: Two-Dimensional Design Honors
Students work in a self-directed environment to develop a portfolio showing a body of their own work that visually explores a particular artistic concern, articulated and supported by a written artist's statement. Artists may work in, but are not limited to, content in drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, traditional photography, digital
photography, and/or new media and emerging technologies that demonstrate understanding of design principles as applied to a 2-dimensional surface. Students regularly reflect on aesthetics and art issues individually and as a group, and manipulate the structural elements of art and organizational principles of design to create 2-dimensional works of art that are progressively more innovative and representative of the student's artistic and cognitive growth. In keeping with the rigor expected in an accelerated setting, students' portfolios show personal vision and artistic growth over time, mastery of visual art skills and techniques, and evidence of sophisticated analytical and problem-solving skills
based on their structural, historical, and cultural knowledge. Students are self-directed and display readiness for high levels of critical thinking, research, conceptual thinking, and creative risk-taking. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.


Advanced Placement Art History
The AP Art History course is equivalent to a two‚Äźsemester introductory college course that explores topics such as the nature of art, art making, and responses to art. By investigating a specific image set of 250 works of art characterized by diverse artistic traditions from prehistory to the present, the course fosters in-depth, holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective. Students become active participants in the global art world, engaging with its forms and content, as they experience, research, discuss, read, and write about art, artists, art making, and responses to and interpretations of art.

Digital Art Imaging
Students explore advanced topics through project-based work, becoming more self-directed in their acquisition and use of concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications to design, create, print, and display original two-dimensional graphic and fine works of art in print and web formats. As they become more adept at using the tools and techniques available to them, students design and produce digital still images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own designs and images and those of their peers to measure artistic growth with increasing sophistication and independence to promote risk-taking in the completion of conceptually based, self-directed work. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.